Some books I've been reading...

(a partial list, in rough reverse order, some w/ approx. [completion dates])

"The Question of Palestine" Edward W. Said [11/17]

"Revolution from Above: The Demise of the Soviet System" David Kotz & Fred Weir, plus last few chapters of the same authors' update, "Russia's Path from Gorbachev to Putin" [10/17]

"The Age of Extremes: A History of the World 1914-1991" Eric Hobsbawm[10/17]

"The Wretched of the Earth" Frantz Fanon [9/17]

"Before European Hegemony: The World System A.D. 1250-1350" Janet L. Abu-Lughod [9/17]

"1948: The First Arab-Israeli War" Benny Morris [9/17]

"Capitalist Realistm: Is There No Alternative?" & "Exiting the Vampire Castle" Mark Fisher [8/17]

"The Iron Cage: The Story of the Palestinian Struggle for Statehood" Rashid Khalidi [8/17]

"The Inheritance of Rome: Illuminating the Dark Ages 400-1000" Chris Wickham [7/17]

"Kill All Normies: Online culture wars from 4chan and Tumblr to Trump and the alt-right" Angela Nagle [7/17]

"Revolution in the Air: Sixties Radicals turn to Lenin, Mao and Che" Max Elbaum [6/17]

"Effortless Mastery" Kenny Werner [5/17]

"The Age of Empire: 1875-1914" Eric Hobsbawm [5/17]

"Bismarck and the German Empire" Erich Eyck [4/17]

"The Filter Bubble: What the Internet is Hiding from You" Eli Pariser [4/17]

"Surfing Uncertainty: Prediction, Action, and the Embodied Mind" Andy Clark [3/17]

"The Age of Capital: 1848-1875" Eric Hobsbawm [2/17]

"Anton Wilhelm Amo: The Intercultural Background of his Philosophy" Jacob Emmanuel Mabe [2/17]

"Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877" Eric Foner [2/17]

"Team of Rivals: the Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln" Doris Kearns Goodwin[12/16]

"Hearing the Other Side: Deliberative versus Participatory Democracy" Diana C. Mutz [12/16]

"Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy: Lord and Peasant in the Making of the Modern World" Barrington Moore, Jr. [11/16]

"Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party before the Civil War" Eric Foner [10/16]

"Steps Towards Life: A Perspective on Evolution" Manfred Eigen (There was a lot that I lacked the chemistry, and sometimes the math, to really follow, though.) [9/16]

"Representing and intervening: Introductory topics in the philosophy of natural science" Ian Hacking [9/16]

"Existentialism is a Humanism" & "A Commentary on The Stranger" Jean-Paul Satre [8/16]

"The Language of Thought" Jerry A. Fodor [8/16]

"Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are" Frans de Waal [8/16]

"The Second Sex", Simone de Beauvoir (Borde & Malovany-Chevallier, trans.) [7/16]

"Who Cooked Adam Smith's Dinner: A Story of Women and Economics", Katrine Marçal [6/16]

"Simone de Beauvoir: A Life of Freedom", Carol Ascher [6/16]

"Existentialism: A Beginner's Guide", Thomas E. Wartenberg [5/16]

"One Hundred Years of Socialism", Donald Sassoon [4/16]

"The Anatomy of Fascism", Robert O. Paxton [1/16]

"The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion", Jonathan Haidt [12/15]

"Injustice: The Social Bases of Obedience and Revolt", Barrington Moore, Jr [12/15]

"Rationality for Mortals: How People Cope with Uncertainty", Gerd Gigerenzer [11/15]

"The Wave in the Mind: Talks and Essays on the Writer, the Reader, and the Imagination", Ursula K. LeGuin [10/15]

"The New Imperial Presidency: Renewing Presidential Power after Watergate", Andrew Rudalevige [10/15]

"The Imperial Presidency", Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. [9/15]

"National Security and Double Government", Michael J. Glennon [8/15]

"Black Against Empire: The History and Politics of the Black Panther Party", Joshua Bloom and Waldo E. Martin, Jr. [8/15]

"Leila Khaled: Icon of Palestinian Liberation", Sarah Irving [7/15]

"The American Evasion of Philosophy: A Genealogy of Pragmatism", Cornel West [7/15]

"Reflections on the Revolution in France: A Critical Edition", Edmund Burke (ed. and anotated by J.C.D. Clark) [6/15]

"Twelve Who Ruled: The Year of the Terror in the French Revolution", R. R. Palmer [5/15]

"The French Revolution, Vol 1: from its origins to 1793", Georges Lefebvre [4/15]

"Garibaldi", Jasper Ridley [3/15]

"Americanos: Latin America's Struggle for Independence", John Charles Chasteen [3/15]

"The Age of Revolution: 1789-1848", Eric Hobsbawm [2/15]

"The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L'Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution", C.L.R. James [2/15]

"The Age of Jackson", Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. [1/15]

"Democratic Promise: The Populist Moment in America", Lawrence Goodwyn [12/14]

"Capital in the Twenty-First Century", Thomas Piketty [11/14]

"The Hidden Injuries of Class", Richard Sennett & Jonathan Cobb [7/14]

"Essays in Experimental Logic", John Dewey [7/14]

"Intuition Pumps and Other Tools for Thinking", Daniel C. Dennet [5/14]

"Where Mathematics Comes From: How the embodied mind brings mathematics into being", George Lakoff and Rafael. E. Núñez [4/14]

"The Nature of Mathematical Knowledge", Philip Kitcher [3/14]

"Taking Darwin Seriously", Michael Ruse [2/14]

"Social Conflicts in the Roman Republic", P. A. Brunt [1/14]

"The Class Struggle in the Ancient Greek World", G. E. M. De Ste. Croix (sans Appendices, which were too hard to read if you don't read Latin) [1/14]

"Who Rules America?", 4th Ed., G. William Domhoff [12/13]

"Philosophical Explanations", Robert Nozick [11/13]

"Sex at the Margins: Migration, Labour Markets and the Rescue Industry", Laura Maria Agustin [9/13]

"The War for Muslim Minds: Islam and the West", Gilles Kepel [8/13]

"Orientalism", Edward W. Said (25th Anniversary Ed.) [7/13]

"A Quiet Revolution: The Veil's Resurgence, from the Middle East to America", Leila Ahmed [7/13]

"Elbow Room: The Varieties of Free Will Worth Wanting", Daniel C. Dennett [6/13]

"Roman Republics", Harriet I. Flower [6/13]

"The Age of Keynes", Robert Lekachman [5/13]

"Money: Whence It Came, Where It Went", John Kenneth Galbraith [5/13]

"Naturalizing Epistemology", Hilary Kornblith, ed. [3/13]

"Darwin's Dangerous Idea", Daniel C. Dennett [1/13]

In late 2012 I was reading in various books that, for one reason or another, I haven't finished yet. Some of them I put aside for a while, because events took me in other directions. The list includes: William Greider "Secrets of the Temple", Adam Smith "Theory of Moral Sentiments", Hilary Kornbluth, Ed. "Naturalizing Epistemology" and Elizabeth Gurley Flynn "The Rebel Girl". I also reread a good bit of Daniel Dennett's "Breaking the Spell", and read some good chunks of a couple of computer books, "PHP, MySQL, Javascript & CSS" and "Professional WordPress Design and Development", not to mention "WordPress for Dummies", "Podcasting for Dummies" and a couple of books on sound engineering.

"A People's Guide to the Federal Budget", National Priorities Project [10/12]

"Democracy and Its Critics", Robert A. Dahl [8/12]

"Primates and Philosophers: How Morality Evolved", Frans de Waal, et al [7/12]

"Habits of the Heart: Individualism and Commitment in American Life", Bellah, Madsen, Sullivan, Swidler, Tipton [6/12]

"The Origins of Democratic Thinking: The invention of politics in classical Athens", Cynthia Farrar [5/12]

"Democracy: The Unfinished Journey 508 BC to ad 1993", Ed. John Dunn [3/12]

"Gorgias, Menexenus, Protagoras", Plato [1/12]

"The ‘S’ Word: A short history of an American tradition... Socialism", John Nichols [1/12]

"Citizen Tom Paine", Howard Fast [12/11]

"The Idea of Justice", Amartya Sen [12/11]

"Naming and Necessity", Saul A. Kripke [11/11]

"Experience & Education", John Dewey [9/11]

"The Enigma of Capital and the Crises of Capitalism" David Harvey [9/11]

"Social Choice & Individual Values" Kenneth J. Arrow... at least a first reading...  Also, over past few weeks read "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian", by Sherman Alexie & William Gibson's "Pattern Recognition".  [6/11]

"Main St. $marts: Who got us into this economic mess, and how we get through it..." Grace Ross [5/11]

"Quiddities: An Intermittently Philosophical Dictionary" W. V. Quine [5/11 - after picking away at it for years]

"Theory and Reality: An Introduction to the Philosopy of Science" Peter Godfrey-Smith [4/11]

Read a little more than half of "The World Turned Upside Down: Radical Ideas During the English Revolution" by Christopher Hill, but got a little bored with it. Also finished "The Classic Philip Jose Farmer: 1952-1964", which I started last summer, and read an old crime novel "An Eye for an Eye" by Leigh Brackett. [3/11]

"Oliver Cromwell and the Rule of the Puritans in England" C.H. Firth [2/11]

"Ideology & Utopia: An Introduction to the Sociology of Knowledge" Karl Mannheim [2/11]  I've also been reading in Jane Harrison's "Themis", and read a novel "The Laughter of Aphrodite" by Peter Green.  Plus some math books, or maybe that was earlier.

"The Dialectical Biologist" Richard Levins and Richard Lewontin [11/10]

"The Populist Moment: A Short History of the Agrarian Revolt in America" Lawrence Goodwyn [10/10]

"Selections from the Prison Notebooks" Antonio Gramsci (Hoare & Smith, ed.) [10/10]

"A Common Faith" John Dewey [9/10]

"The Other Side of Paradise: A Memoir" Staceyann Chin [8/10]

"False Profits: Recovering from the Bubble Economy" Dean Baker [7/10]

"Antonio Gramsci" Antonio A. Santucci [6/10]

"A Brief History of Time - from the big bang to black holes" Stephen W. Hawking [6/10]

Reread Machiavelli's "The Prince" (don't think I'd read it since I was a teenager) - also reread parts of the "Discourses" [5/10]

"Preface to A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy", "Theses on Feuerback" and "The German Ideology: Part I" by Karl Marx in "The Marx-Engels Reader" Ed. by Robert C. Tucker (for the Boston DSA Reading Group), also the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy's article on Feuerbach, and reread Russell's article on Hegel in "History of Western Philosophy". [5/10]

"Violent Politics: A history of insurgency, terrorism & guerrilla war from the American Revolution to Iraq" William R. Polk [5/10]

"Plunder and Blunder: The Rise and Fall of the Bubble Economy" Dean Baker [4/10]

"Created Unequal" James K. Galbraith [2/10]

"Consciousness Explained" Daniel C. Dennet [2/10]

"The Triple Helix: Gene, Organism and Environment" Richard Lewontin [1/10]

"The Nature of Selection: Evolutionary Theory in Philosophical Focus" Elliot Sober [12/09]

"The Future of Democratic Equality: Building Social Solidarity in a Fragmented America" Joseph M. Schwartz [11/09]

"Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature" Richard Rorty (yeah, well, I tried. urgh.) [10/09]

"Sparta and Lakonia: A Regional History 1300 to 362 B.C." Paul Cartledge [9/09]

"Good Natured: The Origins of Right and Wrong in Humans and Other Animals" Frans De Waal [9/09]

"Philosophy and Feminist Thinking" Jean Grimshaw [8/09]

"The Return of Depression Economics and the Crisis of 2008" Paul Krugman [8/09]

"Galbraith & Market Capitalism" David Reisman [8/09]

"Economics and the Public Purpose" John Kenneth Galbraith [7/09]

"Ontological Relativity & Other Essays" W.V. Quine (Well, I did my best...) [7/09]

"The Conservative Mind: From Burke to Eliot" Russell Kirk [6/09]

"The Predator State: How Conservatives Abandoned the Free Market, and Why Liberals Should Too" James K. Galbraith (And a worthy successor to his dad he’s turned out to be!) [6/09]

"Leviathan" Thomas Hobbes (Barely skimmed most of Parts 3 & 4. The tortured logic of their argument, which seeks to derive a doctrine rational and consistant, if false, from a scripture that is arbitrary, irrational, and inconsistant, is of interest as an historical curiosity, only, and curiosity is not strong enough to justify the investment.) [5/09]

"A History of the Roman World 753 to 146 BC" H. H. Scullard [5/09]

Whilst reading in some more books on Rome and one on European prehistory, managed to get in a few novels and a short book on Freud:  Leigh Brackett’s "No Good From a Corpse", Jack Williamson’s "Darker Than You Think", Tariq Ali’s, "The Book of Saladin", and "Freud: A Very Short Introduction" by Anthony Storr [3/09]

"The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Republic" Harriet I. Flower, ed. [2/09]

"Perils of Empire: The Roman Republic and the American Republic" Monte L. Pearson [1/09]

"After Virtue (2nd Ed.)" Alasdair MacIntyre [12/08]

"The Greco-Persian Wars" Peter Green [12/08]

Reread Finley's "Politics in the Ancient World"  [12/08]

"Gödel's Proof"  Ernest Nagel and James R. Newman [11/08]

"Methods of Logic" Willard Van Orman Quine (Mostly review—but a classic! I read it quickly, without doing a lot of Examples. Now I can get back to "Set Theory and It's Logic"...) [11/08]

"Word & Object" Willard Van Orman Quine [9/08]

"African Political Leadership: Jomo Kenyatta, Kwame Nkruma and Julisu K. Nyerere" A.B. Assensoh (Fascinating topic - not a very good book.) [8/08]

"Empire’s Workshop: Latin America, the United States and the Rise of the New Imperialism" Greg Grandin [7/08]

"Understanding Thermodynamics" H.C. Van Ness [7/08]

"Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon" Daniel C. Dennet [6/08]

"Neurophilosophy: Toward a Unified Science of the Mind/Brain" Patricia Smith Churchland [6/08 - but mostly read April & May]

"How to Rule the World: The Coming Battle Over the Global Economy" Mark Engler [5/08]

"From a Logical Point of View" Willard Van Orman Quine [5/08]

"Plato and Parmenides" tr. w/ commentary by Francis M. Cornford [4/08]

"Plato's Theory of Knowledge: The Theaetetus and The Sophist" tr. w/ commentary by Francis M. Cornford [3/08]

"The Ancient Economy" M.I. Finley [2/08]

"The New Industrial State (4th Ed.)" John Kenneth Galbraith [2/08]

"Democracy and Classical Greece" J. K. Davies [2/08]

"Where Does the Weirdness Go? Why Quantum Mechanics is Strange, But Not As Strange As You Think" David Lidley [1/08]

"Sex and Rockets: The Occult World of Jack Parsons" John Carter [1/08]

"The Classical Athenian Democracy" David Stockton [1/08]

"The Affluent Society (4th Ed. Revised and Updated)" John Kenneth Galbraith [12/07]

"John Kenneth Galbraith: His Life, His Politics, His Economics" Richard Parker [11/07]

"Economic Philosopy" Joan Robinson [10/07]

"Towards the Understanding of Karl Marx: A Revolutionary Interpretation" Sidney Hook [9/07] (I did not read all the introduction & appendix material)

"In the Shadow of Man" Jane Goodall [9/07] (mostly read earlier in the summer, though)

"Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity" Sarah B. Pomeroy [9/07]  (I read her "Women in Hellenistic Egypt" years ago, having come across it by accident, but somehow never sought this one out until reading Leila Ahmed, who makes important connections to it.)

"'They Take Our Jobs!' and 20 other myths about immigration" Aviva Chomsky [9/07]

"A Border Passage: from Cairo to America - A Woman's Journey" Leila Ahmed  (Boy! I love this woman.  Please write another book, Ms. Ahmed!) [8/07]

"Changing the Powers That Be: How the Left Can Stop Losing and Win" G. William Domhoff [8/07]

"Women and Gender in Islam" Leila Ahmed [8/07]

"Experience and Nature" John Dewey [8/07] (but, man! do I need to read it again!)

"The Essential Dewey" Hickman & Alexander, ed. (Read most of Vol 1 & some of Vol 2, then put aside to read "Experience & Nature" - needed more depth) [1/07 - 6/07]

"The GOD Delusion" Richard Dawkins [6/07]

"Greek Religion" Walter Burkert [5/07]

"The History" Herodotus (David Grene, Translator) [4/07]

"Sisu - Even Through a Stone Wall" Oskari Tokoi [1/07]

"Lucy: The Beginnings of Humankind" Donald Johanson & Maitland Edey [1/07]

"The Quest for Community" Robert Nisbet [1/07]

"Two Treatises of Government" John Locke [12/06]

"Anarchy, State, and Utopia" Robert Nozick (needed wider margins) [12/06]

"Chimpanzee Politics: Power & Sex Among Apes" Frans De Waal [11/06]

"Socialism" Michael Harrington [11/06]

"Capital (Vol. 1)" Karl Marx [10/06]

"Reason, Truth and History", Hilary Putnam (yeah, well I understood maybe 1/2 to 2/3 of it. Maybe.) [9/06]

"Mental Spaces" Gilles Fouconnier (A lot of the technical linguistic stuff I had to skip/skim as he assumed more background knowledge than I had, and it wasn't my primary interest, so it didn't seem worth putting the book aside to acquire the requisite background.) [9/06]

"Women, Fire, and Dangerous Things: What Categories Reveal about the Mind" George Lakoff [8/06]

"Pericles of Athens and the Birth of Democracy", Donald Kagan [7/06]

"Don't Think of An Elephant: Know Your Values and Frame the Debate" George Lakoff [7/06]

"The Economics of Innocent Fraud" J. K. Galbraith [5/06]

"America Beyond Capitalism" Gar Alperovitz [5/06]

"Civilization and Its Discontents" Sigmund Freud [4/06]

"Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Descarte and the Meditations" Gary Hatfield [4/06]

"Electoral Systems: A comparative introduction" David M. Farrell [3/06]

"Teachings from the Worldly Philosophers" Robert Heilbroner [2/06]

"Kicking Away the Ladder: Development Strategies in Historical Perspective" Ha-Joon Chang [1/06]

"Meaning and Necessity" Rudolph Carnap [11/05]

"Giving Up the Gun: Japan's Reversion to the Sword, 1543-1879", Noel Perrin [9/05]

"Caesar: Politician and Statesman", Matthias Gelzer [9/05]

"Nine Parts of Desire: the Hidden World of Islamic Women", Geraldine Brooks [8/05]

"The Peloponnesian War", Donald Kagan [8/05]

M.I. Finley, "Politics in the Ancient World" [8/05]

M.I. Finley, "The World of Odysseus" [7/05]

"Wet Mind (The New Cognitive Neuroscience)", Stephen M. Kosslyn & Olivier Koenig [prev. read thru Ch. 3, but started over at Ch. 2; 4/05-7/05, roughly]

David Hume, "An Inquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals" [6/05]

Victor Davis Hanson, "The Western Way of War" [5/05]

"Pragmatism: A Reader", Louis Menard, Ed. (Charles Sanders Pierce, William James, John Dewey, et al) [4/05]

John Stuart Mill, "The Subjection of Women" (at last completing "On Liberty and Other Essays") [4/05]

"Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion" and "The Natural History of Religion", David Hume [3/05]

Locke "Selections" (mostly from Essay Concerning Human Understanding, a little from Treatise of Civil Government, and other works) [2/05]

"The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money", John Maynard Keynes [mostly 8/04 but finished 1/05, but really needs rereading...]

"The Nature of the Gods", Cicero [1/05]

"Five Stages of Greek Religion", Gilbert Murray [1/05]

"Prolegomena to Any Future Metaphysics", Immanuel Kant [1/05]

"Meditations on First Philosophy", Rene Descartes [1/05]

“Considerations on Representative Government”, John Stuart Mill (in "On Liberty and Other Essays") [11/04]

"The Twelve Caesers", Suetonius [11/04]

"An Introduction to Mathematics" Alfred North Whitehead [10/04]

"The Problems of Philosophy", Bertrand Russell [10/04]

"Against Capitalism", David Schweickart [9/04]

"After Capitalism", David Schweickart [7/04]

"Philosophical Theories of Probability", Donald Gillies [7/04]

"Raw Deal: How Myths and Misinformation About the Deficit, Inflation, and Wealth Impoverish America", Ellen Frank [7/04]

“On Liberty” and “Utilitarianism”, John Stuart Mill (in "On Liberty and Other Essays")

"A Theory of Justice", John Rawls [6/04]

"Algebra of Probable Inference", Richard T. Cox (axiomatic derivation of probability theory from mathematical logic - using two VERY simple axioms, plus an assumption of differentiability) [6/04]

"The Wealth of Nations", Adam Smith [c. 11/03 thru 5/04]

"Autobiography", J. S. Mill [5/04]

"The Republic", Plato [c. 4/04]

"The Republic and The Laws", Marcus Tullius Cicero

"From the Gracchi to Nero (A history of Rome from 133 BC to AD 68)", H. H. Scullard

[parts of] "The Twelve Caesars", Suetonious [c. 12/03]

"The Discourses (on Livy)", Niccolo Machiavelli

"Nichomachean Ethics" and [about 1/2 of] "Politics", Aristotle

"Beyond the Limits of Thought", Graham Priest (roughly on how antinomies always arise if we push certain types of argument to their logical limits, and what might be the philosophical implications if we were to embrace, or at least accept, them, rather than rejecting them.) [c. 11/03 - read about 1/2 then put aside for now]

"An Introduction to Non-Classical Logic", Graham Priest [c. 10/03]

"Meno", "Crito", "Phaedo", Plato [c. 9/03]

"An Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding", David Hume [c. 9/03]

"Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Limits", Bertrand Russell [c. 8/03]

"Wet Mind (The New Cognitive Neuroscience)", Stephen M. Kosslyn & Olivier Koenig [read thru Ch. 3, then put aside for a while - finished c. 7/05]

"Principles of Mathematics", Bertrand Russell [read into Ch. 6, then put aside for now]

"Elementary Logic", Willard Van Orman Quine

"Foundations of Analysis (The Arithmetic of Whole, Rational, Irrational and Complex Numbers)", Edmund Landau [c. 6/03]

"Symbolic Logic", Susanne K. Langer

"Foundations and Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics", Howard Eves [c. 3/03]

var. essays in "The Basic Writings of Bertrand Russell"

"A History of Western Philosophy", Bertrand Russell

"Wisdom of the West", Bertrand Russell [? late /02, early '03?]

And I probably should mention...
a whole bunch more I've read or at least read at that I'm not listing 'cause I can't be bothered to dig up the citation, or figure out roughly when I read 'em, like that "One Market Under God" book (Frank), a few computer books (Perl, XML, Windows XP), a book called "Bitch" on labeling of girls, a few lefty or feminist books like "Backlash", "Global Woman", (half of) "Making Sweatshops", "Nickel and Dimed", that I think fell into this time frame, not to mention engineering stuff.... and a BUNCH more that are still in my unread/in-progress pile.

Not to mention the occasional novel or science-fiction or fantasy book (even though I no longer read 1-2 paperback SF books a day, the way I used to in high school, many years ago...)

Not really 50 list -- Home Page.